Join me @ IBOtoolbox for free.
Vlad Tverdohleb
Member Since: 7/26/2015
  
performance / stats
Country: Canada
Likes Received: 151
Featured Member: 1 times
Associates: 155
Wall Posts: 382
Comments Made: 63
Press Releases: 370
Videos: 0
Phone: 015144814545
Skype:     theprservices
profile visitor stats
TODAY: 21
THIS MONTH: 667
TOTAL: 71930
are we ibo associates?
recent videos
member advertising
none
active associates
Ezworksystem Opportunities    
Last logged on: 6/17/2019


Chizoba Nworjih    
Last logged on: 6/17/2019


Linda Michel White       
Last logged on: 6/17/2019


Ted Hunter     
Last logged on: 6/17/2019


Todd Treharne    
Last logged on: 6/17/2019


Curtiss Martin    
Last logged on: 6/17/2019


Kenneth Leon    
Last logged on: 6/17/2019


PHIL SCHAEFER    
Last logged on: 6/17/2019


Phil Schaefer    
Last logged on: 6/17/2019


Emmanuel Mba    
Last logged on: 6/17/2019


Athena Gay    
Last logged on: 6/17/2019


Kris Karafotas     
Last logged on: 6/17/2019


Mark Turnbull    
Last logged on: 6/17/2019


Mike Farris    
Last logged on: 6/17/2019


mourad marketer    
Last logged on: 6/17/2019


other ibo platforms
Vlad Tverdohleb   My Press Releases

The Digest: Doctors Repair Infants’ Damaged Hearts With Experimental Procedure

Published on 7/11/2018
For additional information  Click Here

by Kristin Houser  Health & Medicine

THE POWERHOUSE OF THE CELL. Doctors at Boston Children’s Hospital have developed a new kind of transplant that is giving infants with damaged hearts a chance to lead a normal, healthy life. These babies aren’t receiving new organs, though. Instead, doctors are transplanting mitochondria from the infant’s own muscle cells right into their failing hearts — and they’re finding the experimental procedure produces remarkable results, according to a new report by The New York Times.

Every cell in our body contains a mitochondrion. These tiny specialized structures provide the cell with the energy it needs to do its thing. If a cell loses its supply of oxygen-rich blood, its mitochondrion can die, and the rest of the cell can follow. This damage to the mitochondrion can sometimes happen to heart cells during cardiac arrest or surgery to fix a heart defect. Even if the cells survive, they may be weak, and the heart can’t beat normally as a result.

A FULL RECOVERY. James McCully is a scientist who studies adult hearts. Through his research, he realized something remarkable about mitochondria: if he extracted the mitochondria from the muscle cells in a pig’s abdomen and injected them into the animal’s damaged (but not dead) heart cells, the pig’s heart recovered.

In 2015, McCully teamed up with Sitaram Emani, a pediatric heart surgeon at Boston Children’s Hospital, to test the mitochondrial transplant in a newborn with a heart damaged during surgery to fix a defect. McCully extracted roughly 1 billion mitochondria from a small piece of muscle from the baby’s abdomen and injected them back into the most damaged part of the baby’s heart. Within two days, the baby’s heart was beating the same way a healthy one would.

SAVING LIVES. In total, the doctors have tested their mitochondrial transplant technique in 11 newborns, and eight of those babies are now doing well, according to The NYT’s report. For infants with the same condition that hadn’t received such a transplant, the death rate was 65 percent. Of the 35 percent that survived, none recovered their heart function, and a third ended up on transplant waiting lists. So the procedure, if it proves to be effective, would help improve the lives of children who had few other options.

Read more here.

Member Note: To comment on this PR, simply click reply on the owners main post below.
-  Copyright 2016 IBOsocial  -            Part of the IBOtoolbox family of sites.